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Bykaterina

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Since I started this beautiful journey into the crochet world, I designed a Cover Up dress each summer and I m happy to share with yo another one: Erastis Cover Up Dress.

You can Purchase the easy printable PDF version of this pattern here:

 

When I chose the name for this dress I was inspired by the stitch pattern I used and Greece, one of my favorite summer destinations.

Erastis in Greek, means “lover” and  the Solomon’s Knot stitch pattern it’s also called  Lover’s Knot, so this dress is a lover’s one and I can tell that I love everything about it.

I noticed this stitch pattern for long time ago, but wasn’t sure until now if I can deal with it. The truth is, that this stitch pattern is not difficult at all, and works super fast. 

Another question mark I had was if this stitch pattern will work for garments, because most of the designs I saw were shawls or scarfs. After making this dress, the answer is yes. It’s perfect for a bikini cover up, but if you put a tank underneath and use a cord or a belt to make it shorter and also to give some volume to the top part, it can be also worn as a chick tunic with no problems.

Anyways, I hope you will like it and I can’t wait to see yours.

 

Materials you will need

  • Category 3, light, DK weight yarn
  • 3  mm  crochet hook
  • Yarn needle for wave in ends
  • Scissors
  • 2 stitch markers

Notes about design

This pattern requires techniques as single crochet, triple crochet, and Solomon’s knot stitches (or loops)

The entire dress is worked in Solomon’s Knot Stitch also known as Lover’s Knot stitch pattern.

The dress construction is of 2 panels, back and front panel. On the front panel we will decrease to give a V neckline shape to the dress.

Final Measurements

Final measurements of the dress are listed below. All measurements are taken after blocking. In the pattern notes below you will find indications about the gauge and how to measure it.

The pattern is available in 8 sizes form S up to 5XL and is written in US terms.

Measurements for sizes M, L, XL, 2XL, 3XL, 4XL and 5XL are written between brackets.

Neck width a: 27 cm (27, 27, 27, 32,32,32,32)

Bust width b: 43 cm (48, 53, 58, 63, 6, 73, 78)

Hips Width c: 48 cm (53, 58, 63, 68, 73, 78, 83)

Armhole Depth d: 24 cm (24, 27, 27, 30, 30, 33, 33)

Length e: 95 cm (95, 95, 95, 98, 98, 98, 98)

This measurements will fit:

To Fit S M L XL 2XL 3XL 4XL 5XL
Hips 90 100 110 120 130 140 150 160
Bust 86 96 106 116 126 136 146 156

 

How much yarn do you need?

For this design I used Concept Versailles  by Katia. This yarn is a 97% Viscose, 2% Polyamide and 1% Nylon. The yarn has an amazing drape and was perfect for the stitch pattern used for dress.

Any yarn in the same weight category will work, but you have to check the yarn behavior when is worked in this stitch pattern (how stretchy is and how much the swatch measurements are changing after blocking; more details in the pattern notes)

Each ball of Concept Versailles by Katia has 50 grams and 100 meters.

For each size you will approximate need:

Katia Versailles S M L XL 2XL 3XL 4XL 5XL
50g/100m 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15

Abbreviation used in the pattern

  • Ch – chain
  • Sc – single crochet
  • St(s) – stitch (es)
  • Tc – triple crochet
  • SKL – Solomon’s knot loop as explained below
  • Tsc – twisted single crochet: insert the hook into next available loop, yarn aver and pull out a loop, twist the hook clock wise, yarn over and pull the yarn through both loops on your hook
  • St(s) – stitch(es)
  • ** – repeated section
  • R| – row/round

Stitch pattern

The Erastis Cover Up Dress is worked using Solomon’s Knot stitch Pattern.

Solomon’s Knot Stitch Pattern

First let’s see how a Solomon’s knot stitch or loop is made (SKL).

Step 1

Use your crochet hook to pull the loop up to a taller height, about 1 cm.

 Step 2

Yarn over and pull through the loop on the hook.

Step 3

Hold your work up and take a close look at what you see there. You should see a loop that has two strands in the front, closest to you, and another solo strand in the back. Insert your hook underneath that solo strand in the back of the work. Yarn over and make a single crochet st.

This was the SKL, Solomon’s Knot stitch or loop (we will call it in this pattern loop)

Now, let’s see how we are working with this loops in rows, to create our pattern.

Below you can find the stitch chart:

You can Purchase the easy printable PDF version of this pattern here:

The stitch pattern is a 2 rows repeat.

We will start working the Solomon’s knot stitch in a single crochet row. This pattern requires a multiple of 4+1 stitches.

Here are the rows after the row in single crochet:

R1|: Ch 1, 1 sc in first st, *2 SKL, skip 3 sts, 1 sc in next st. * Repeat to the end of the row.

R2|: ch 4, 1 SKL, skip next SKL, 1 sc in next sc, *2 SKL, skip next 2 SKL, 1 sc in next sc. * Repeat to the end of the row. Finish the row with 1 SKL, skip last SKL, 1 tc in the last sc. Ch 1 and turn

R3|: 1 sc in 1st sc, *2 SKL, skip next 2 SKL, 1 sc in next sc. *Repeat to the end of the row.

Repeat R2 and R3.

Gauge

4 spaces or 8 SKL = 10 cm

3 spaces or 6 rows = 10 cm

*the swatch was measured after blocking

*space = the space between 2 knots

Notes about the pattern

You will need an odd number of spaces, or the multiple of 4 to be odd.

First, make a swatch in the stitch pattern. I will suggest to wet block the swatch to see exactly the yarn behavior after blocking.

For example, with the yarn I used for the dress, my swatch expanded after wet blocking. For example before blocking I had 5 spaces or 10 SKL in 10 cm and after blocking I had 4 spaces in 10 cm.

After having the swatch measured after blocking, check measurements diagram and see with how many sts you will have to start with.

For example I had 4 spaces in 10 cm and I needed for the hips 48 cm. This means that I will need 48 x 4/10 = 19,2 spaces. I end up with 19 spaces.

For each space or 2 SKL you will need 4 ch st.

So, the starting chain will be 19 x 4 = 76 sts. To this number add 1 st as the pattern requires. So, the foundation chain will be of 77 sts.

In this way, no matter,  what is your gauge , you can calculate how many sts you will need to start with.

Ch 1, at the beginning of  row doesn’t count as a sc

Numbers for sizes M, L, XL, 2XL, 3XL, 4XL and 5XL are written between brackets. If not the pattern applies for all sizes

Instructions

Front Panel

Start| ch 77 (85, 93, 101, 109, 117, 125, 133) sts

Foundation Row: ch 1, 1 sc in each st to the end of the row. Ch 1 and turn

R1|: Ch 1, 1 sc in first st, *2 SKL, skip 3 sts, 1 sc in next st. * Repeat to the end of the row.

After R1 you will have 19 (21, 23, 25, 27, 29, 31, 33) spaces or 38 (42, 46, 50, 54, 58, 62, 66) SKL.

R2|: ch 4, 1 SKL, skip next SKL, 1 sc in next sc, *2 SKL, skip next 2 SKL, 1 sc in next sc. * Repeat to the end of the row. Finish the row with 1 SKL, skip last SKL, 1 tc in the last sc. Ch 1 and turn

R3|: 1 sc in 1st sc, *2 SKL, skip next 2 SKL, 1 sc in next sc. *Repeat to the end of the row.

R4 – R25| Repeat R2 and R3

*if you want the dress to be longer or shorter make more or less rows for this section, but make sure you have an odd number of rows.

For the next 2 rows, we will decrease at the beginning and at the end of the row.

After these 2 rows, we will end up with 2 spaces less than we started.

R26| ch 4, skip 1 SKL, 1 sc in next sc, *2 SKL, skip next 2 SKL, 1 sc in next sc. * Repeat to the end of the row, skip last SKL, 1 tc in the last sc, ch 1 and turn.

R27| 1 sc in 1st sc, 1 SKL, skip next SKL, 1 sc in next sc,*2 SKL, skip next 2 SKL, 1 sc in next sc. *Repeat to the end of the row.

R28 – R45| Repeat R2 – R3

Next, we will start to decrease for the neck line.

Use a stitch marker and place it in the single crochet of the middle space.

While working, you can move the stitch marker into the last knot, to know where you should end the row.

We will work right side and left side of the neck line separately.

Right side

Follow the stitch chart or the pattern written below:

R46R (from right side)| ch 4, 2 SKL, skip 1 SKL, 1 sc in next sc, *2 SKL, skip 2 SKL, 1 sc in next sc. * Repeat to the end of the row (the knot or single crochet before the marked one), 1 tc in the last sc (the marked st). Ch 1 and turn.

R47R| 1 sc in the 1 st sc, 1 SKL, skip 1 SKL, 1 sc in next, *2 SKL, skip 2 SKL, 1 sc in next sc. * Repeat to the end of the row.

Sizes S, M, L, XL

R48R – R55R|: Repeat R46R and R47R

Sizes 2XL, 3XL, 4XL, 5XL

R48R – R57R|: Repeat R46R and R47R

After this rows you finished decreasing. You should end up with 3 (4, 5, 6,6 7, 8, 9) spaces.

For the next 2 rows repeat R2 and R3.

Fasten off.

Left side

Rejoin yarn in the same sc of the middle space.

Follow the stitch chart or the written pattern below:

R46L|: ch 4, skip 1 SKL, 1 sc in next sc, *2 SKL, skip next 2 SKL, 1 sc in next sc. * Repeat to the end of the row. Finish the row with 1 SKL, skip last SKL, 1 tc in the last sc. Ch 1 and turn

*place the stitch marker into the first sc, between the first 2 SKL.

R47L|: 1 sc in 1st sc, *2 SKL, skip next 2 SKL, 1 sc in next sc. *Repeat to the end of the row.

*the end of the row will be the marked stitch.

Sizes S, M, L, XL

R48L – R55L|: Repeat R46L and R47L

Sizes 2XL, 3XL, 4XL, 5XL

R48L – R57L|: Repeat R46L and R47L

After this rows you finished decreasing. You should end up with 3 (4, 5, 6,6 7, 8, 9) spaces.

For the next 2 rows repeat R2 and R3.

Fasten off.

Back Panel

For the back panel follow the same pattern as for the front panel, except that starting with R46 you will have to repeat R2 and R3 to the end.

In case you want a V neck line on the back also, you can follow the exact same pattern.

Don’t fasten off

Assembling

Shoulders

Start joining the shoulders first.

Flip the back panel, to have the start in your right side.

Place the front panel under.

Step1| ch 4, 1 sc in the 1st sc of the front panel

Step 2| 1 SKL, skip 2 SKL from the back panel and make 1 sc in the next sc.

Step 3| 1 SKL, skip 2 SKL from the front panel and make 1 sc in the next sc.

Repeat Steps 2 and 3, until you finish all the stitches from the front panel.

Repeat the same Steps to join the shoulders on the right side.

Side Edges

Use a stitch marker to mark the armholes.

Count from the top (only the ch 4 or tc spaces) 8 (9, 9, 10, 10, 11, 11, 11) spaces.

Sew from the stitch marker to the bottom. You can let a split at the end. I did so, only on one side.

Edging

An edge is added to the neck line, armholes and bottom.

Neck line

Rejoin yarn in one knot in the back.

R1| ch 1, 1 sc, *ch 3, skip 2 SKL, 1 sc in next sc. *Repeat until you inish with the back.

Continue with a sc row, making 2 sc in the SKL side rows and 3 sc in the ch 4 or tc side rows.

*if you worked looser and you feel that is space to make 1 more sc in any of these spaces feel free to make it.

In the valley of the V neck, make a 3 sc decrease, working 3 sc together. The middle knot will be the second sc of the decrease.

Continue with sc stitches until you get to the section left of the back panel. On the back panel make ch 2, skip 2 SKL 1 sc in next sc. Join with sl st with the 1st sc.

R2| ch 1, 1 sc in each st, except the 3 sts in the valley, 3 sc together (the second sc will be the previous round decrease), 1 sc in each st to the end of the row.

R3| ch 1, 1 sc in the same st, 1 Tsc in each st, except the 3 sts in the valley, 3 sc together, 1 tsc to the end of the round.

Fasten off.

Repeat the same pattern for the armhole edging and bottom, 2 rows in sc and 1 row in twisted sc.

To finish

Wave in all end and block to measurements.

You can find a video tutorial here or click the image below.

https://youtu.be/0MnZwn87v6s


You can Purchase the easy printable PDF version of this pattern here:

You can’t imagine how happy I am with this Forever Young Jumpsuit!!! It’s been a long time since I dreamed about making a crocheted jumpsuit and finally I did it!

You can Purchase the easy printable PDF version of this pattern here:

I will definitely wear this all summer!!! 

I really hope you will like this new design and you will make it! 

But first, let’s see what we will need to make it and then get to the instructions. 

Materials you will need

  • Category 4, worsted weight yarn
  • 4.5  mm  crochet hook
  • Yarn needle for wave in ends
  • Elastic band
  • Scissors
  • 8 buttons (1cm diameter)

Notes about design

This pattern requires techniques as single crochet, double crochet, double crochet decrease, single crochet decrease and slip stitches, used also for decrease.

The Jumpsuit is made of 4 panels, 2 back panels and 2 front panels. The pattern is written for one back panel and one front panel and you will have to repeat the pattern for the second panel.

The Jumper has an overs-sized fit with a positive ease of about 6 cm around hips circumference.

Final Measurements

Final measurements of the jumper are listed below. The diagrams represent one of the panels.

The pattern is available in 8 sizes form S up to 5XL and is written in US terms.

Measurements for sizes M, L, XL, 2XL, 3XL, 4XL and 5XL are written between brackets.

Back panel

 

Back Panel Width a: 25 cm (27.5, 30, 32.5, 35, 37.5, 40, 42.5)

Armhole Depth b: 22 cm (25, 26, 27, 28, 30, 31, 31)

Length c: 77 cm (80, 83, 83, 87, 91, 94, 96)

Crotch d: 11 cm (11, 11, 11, 13, 13, 13, 13)

Front Panel

Front panel is similar with the back panel, only that the width is a bit narrower and the crotch is shorter

 

Back Panel Width a: 23 cm (25.5, 28, 30.5, 33, 35.5, 38, 40.5)

Armhole Depth b: 22 cm (25, 26, 27, 28, 30, 31, 31)

Length c: 77 cm (80, 83, 83, 87, 91, 94, 96)

Crotch d: 7 cm (7, 7, 7, 9, 9, 9, 9)

This measurements will fit:

To Fit S M L XL 2XL 3XL 4XL 5XL
Hips 90 100 110 120 130 140 150 160

How much yarn do you need?

For this design I used Concept Veganette by Katia. Each ball of yarn has 50 grams and approximate 140 meters.

For each size you will approximate need:

Stitch pattern

The jumper is worked almost entirely in double crochet stitch. For the edging and buttons line is used single crochet stitch.

Gauge 

16 dc = 10 cm

9 rows = 10 cm

 Abbreviation used in the pattern

  • Ch – chain
  • Sc – single crochet
  • Hdc – half double crochet
  • Dc – double crochet
  • Ss – slip stitch
  • St(s) – stitch (es)
  • Sc dec – single crochet decrease = 2 single crochet worked together
  • Dc dec – double crochet decrease = 2 double crochet worked together
  • ** – repeated section
  • R| – row

Notes about the pattern

  • ch 2 at the beginning of a row doesn’t count as 1st dc
  • if the next row start with a ss, do not chain at the end of the row
  • the numbers for sizes M, L, XL, 2XL, 3XL, 4XL and 5XL are written between brackets. If not the pattern applies for al sizes

You can Purchase the easy printable PDF version of this pattern here:

 Instruction

 Back Panel (make 2)

 Bottom to torso

Start| ch 57 (61, 65, 69, 77, 81, 85, 89) sts

R1| ch 2, 1 dc in the 3rd st, 1 dc in each st to the end of the row. Ch 2 and turn

R2| 1 dc in each st to the end of the row. Ch 2 and turn.

R3 – R11| Repeat row 2.

*in case you want the sorts to be longer, make more rows in this section.

R12| 13 (13, 13, 13, 18, 18, 18, 18) ss, ch 2, 1 dc dec, 1 dc in each st to the end of the row. Ch 2 and turn

R13| 1 dc in each st, except last 2 sts, 1 dc dec. Ch 2 and turn

R14| 2 ss, 1 dc dec, 1 dc in each st to the end of the row. Ch 2 and turn.

R15| Repeat R13

R16| Repeat R14

Next we will start to work without decreasing. We will name the next section Torso to armpit

In case you want you can measure your body, from torso up to where your armhole want to start and see how many rows you will need for this section.

Or you can follow the pattern below.

Torso to armpit

R1| 1 dc in each stitch to the end of the row. Ch 2 an turn.

Repeat row 17 until you have in total (counting all the rows, including the rows from first section)

  • S – 50 rows
  • M – 50 rows
  • L – 52 rows
  • XL – 52 rows
  • 2XL – 54 rows
  • 3XL – 56 rows
  • 4XL – 58 rows
  • 5XL – 60 rows

Armhole Depth

R1|4 (4, 6, 6, 8, 8, 10, 10) ss, 1 sc in next 2 sts, 1 hdc in next 2 sts, 1 dc in each st to the end of the row. Ch 2 and turn.

R2|1 dc in each st except last 4 sts, 2 hdc, 1 sc dec in last 2 sts. Ch 1 and turn.

R3|1 sc dec, 1 hdc in next 2 sts, 1 dc in each of the next sts to the end of the row. Ch 2 and turn

R4| 1 dc in each st, except last 4, 1 dc dec in next 2, ch 2 and turn (don’t have work in the last 2 sts)

R5| 1 dc dec, 1 dc in each st to the end of the row. Turn

Beginning with R6 we will start shaping the neckline.

R6| 4 (4, 6, 6, 8, 8, 10, 10) ss, 1 sc in next 2 sts, 1 hdc in next 2 sts, 1 dc in each st except the last 2, 1 dc dec, ch 2 and turn.

R7| 1 dc dec, 1 dc in each st except last 4, 2 hdc 1 sc dec, ch 1 and turn.

R8| 1 sc dec, 1 hdc in next 2 sts, 1 dc in each of next sts, except last 4, 1 dc dec in next 2 (don’t work in the last 2 sts)

R9| 1 dc dec, 1 dc in each st, except the last 2, 1 dc dec, ch 2 and turn.

R10| 1 dc in each st to the end of the row. Ch 2 and turn.

Repeat R9 and R10 until you have only 7 ( 7, 7, 7, 9, 9, 11, 11) sts left.

Strap

R1| 1 dc in each st, ch 2 and turn.

Repeat R1 until you have 30 rows for the strap.

Fasten off.

And the back panel is done! Repeat the pattern to make the other half.

Front panel

Front panels are worked in the same way as the back panel, only that the crotch will be shorter. The front panels are narrower than half of back panel.

Bottom to torso

Start| Ch 47 (51, 55, 59, 67, 71, 75, 79) sts

R1| ch 2, 1 dc in the 3rd st, 1 dc in each st to the end of the row. Ch 2 and turn

R2| 1 dc in each st to the end of the row. Ch 2 and turn.

R3 – R11| Repeat row 2.

R12| 7 (7, 7, 7, 11,11, 11, 11) ss, ch 2, 1 dc dec, 1 dc in each st to the end of the row. Ch 2 and turn

R13| 1 dc in each st, except last 2 sts, 1 dc dec. Ch 2 and turn

R14| 2 ss, 1 dc dec, 1 dc in each st to the end of the row. Ch 2 and turn.

R15| Repeat R13

R16| Repeat R14

Torso to armpit

R1| 1 dc in each stitch to the end of the row. Ch 2 an turn.

Repeat row 17 until you have in total (counting all the rows, including the rows from first section)

  • S – 50 rows
  • M – 50 rows
  • L – 52 rows
  • XL – 52 rows
  • 2XL – 54 rows
  • 3XL – 56 rows
  • 4XL – 58 rows
  • 5XL – 60 rows

Armhole Depth

R1|4 (4, 6, 6, 8, 8, 10, 10) ss, 1 sc in next 2 sts, 1 hdc in next 2 sts, 1 dc in each st to the end of the row. Ch 2 and turn.

R2|1 dc in each st except last 4 sts, 2 hdc, 1 sc dec in last 2 sts. Ch 1 and turn.

R3|1 sc dec, 1 hdc in next 2 sts, 1 dc in each of the next sts to the end of the row. Ch 2 and turn

R4| 1 dc in each st, except last 4, 1 dc dec in next 2, ch 2 and turn (don’t have work in the last 2 sts)

R5| 1 dc dec, 1 dc in each st to the end of the row. Turn

Beginning with R6 we will start shaping the neckline.

R6| 2 (2, 4, 4, 4, 4, 6, 6) ss, 1 sc in next 2 sts, 1 hdc in next 2 sts, 1 dc in each st except the last 2, 1 dc dec, ch 2 and turn.

R7| 1 dc dec, 1 dc in each st except last 4, 2 hdc 1 sc dec, ch 1 and turn.

R8| 1 sc dec, 1 hdc in next 2 sts, 1 dc in each of next sts, except last 4, 1 dc dec in next 2 (don’t work in the last 2 sts)

R9| 1 dc dec, 1 dc in each st, except the last 2, 1 dc dec, ch 2 and turn.

R10| 1 dc in each st to the end of the row. Ch 2 and turn.

Repeat R9 and R10 until you have only 9 ( 9, 9, 9, 11, 11, 13, 13) sts left.

Strap

R1| 1 dc in each  sts, ch 2 and turn.

R2| 1 dc in next 2 sts, ch 5 (5, 5, 5, 7, 7, 9, 9) sts, skip 5 (5, 5, 5, 7, 7, 9, 9), 1 dc in last 2 sts, ch 2 and turn.

R3| 1 dc in each st (make 1 dc for each ch sts also).

Fasten off

Repeat the pattern for the second front panel.

On the left front panel we will make a buttons line.

Button line

Notes

Count about 10 to 12 rows from torso into the neck line direction. Put a stitch marker to know where you have to stop with the buttons line.

Because we are working in side rows, in each side row dc you will have to make 2 sc.

Count the sts that you have after 1st row and divide the number of sts to the number of buttons you will want to use.

I had 56 sts and I used 8 button. So the pattern on third row was, 1 button hole, 6 sc.

Start| join the yarn in the first st at the neck line.

R1| Ch 1, 1 sc in each st, until the marked st. ch 1 and turn. (I had in total 56 sc)

R2| 1 sc in each st to the end of the row. Ch 1 and turn.

R3| 1 sc in first st, ch 1, skip 1, *1 sc in next 6 sts, ch 1, skip 1. * Repeat until the end of the row, 1 sc in last 5 sts. Ch 1 and turn

R4| Repeat R2

R5| Repeat R2.

Fasten off.

Assembling

First we will start assembling the 2 sides of the back panel.

Follow the diagram below for the seam

When assembling the front panels, you will have to sew up to the buttons line.

Follow the diagram below.

Next both panels, front and back are sewed together.

First, start with the shorts section and sew back with front side.

Next sew the sides.

Edging

A simple edging is added, on the neck line, armholes, and straps and also at the bottom of the shorts. Make one single row in single crochet.

Pockets (make 2)

Start| ch 24 sts (or as many sts as you want to have te pocket as wider as you want.

R1| Ch 2, 1 dc in the 3rd st, 1 dc in each st to the end of the row. Ch 2 and turn.

R2| 1 dc in each st to the end of the row. Ch 2 and turn.

Repeat R2 until you have 12 to 14 rows in total or as many rows as you need to get the pocket as deep as you want.

Fasten off.

Assembling pockets

The best way to know where to place the pockets is to try first the jumpsuit and see where you feel comfortable to have them.

I counted 13 rows from the bottom, and place the pocket with a side next to the side seam.

ou can Purchase the easy printable PDF version of this pattern here:

Use some safety pins to pin the pocket to be easier to sew it.

Sew both pockets at the same high.

To finish

Wave in all ends, sew the buttons and block.

You can find a step by step video tutorial below (click here or on the image)

Forever Young Jumpsuit

 

 

 

 

 

 

When I  used question sticker in my Instagram Stories, telling you to ask me whatever you wanted about me or about my work, a lot of you asked me where do I find inspiration for my designs.

I couldn’t answer in one or even more stories, but here I am with this post and another Designer’s Corner Material about Inspiration.

If you want to start designing crochet or knit garments, or you are already a crochet or knit designer, but you are looking for new inspiration sources,  this post is for you!

I really hope this will help you find your own inspiration and if you find this material useful, I put everything in a PDF format that can be purchased from My Shop. Click here

 

In this material I will talk about inspiration, where you can find inspiration for crochet and knit garments and which sources I am using mostly in my designing process.

Crochet and knit designing is not only about garments and you can design a lot of other things as a crochet or knit designer like accessories or  things for the home.

But, in this material we are talking about garment section because this tends to be the direction in which every crochet or knit designer want to go.

 In this material you will find:

  • About crochet and knit design as a part of fashion design
  • A few sources of inspiration that can be mostly used
  • About inspiration from other crochet or knit designers

Crochet or knit design as part of fashion design

 Are we, crochet or knit designers, fashion designers? What is a fashion designer and what is he doing?

Well, after all designing process every fashion designer attempts to design clothes which are functional as well as aesthetically pleasant.

A crochet or knit designer’s goal is the same. So, a crochet or knit designer can be called a fashion designer? What do you think?

If a fashion designer has to do a lot of research and interpret fashion trends for their audience, the same a crochet or knit designer. Only that after the designing process, the making process is also part of a crochet or knit designer’s job.

If a fashion designer is doing research to decide which fabric he will use for a certain design, a crochet or knit designer has to make his research about the yarn, stitch pattern to actually make the fabric he will want to use for a certain design.

So, a crochet or knit designer’s job is more than just designing. He has to deal with the entire process to make sure that his design is makeable and then of course wearable.

In the end, you are a fashion designer, because the goal is the same: functional and aesthetically pleasant clothes.

Sources of inspiration that can be mostly used

 In this section I will talk only from my experience. I am sure that there are a lot of other sources that you can use for your inspiration, but these are the ones that I am using most all of the time and believe me, I wish I could have more time to bring all the ideas I have to life.

Let’s see which those sources I am using are:

  • Find Inspiration in your own wardrobe

 Using my own clothes as inspiration for my crochet designs (and lately my knitting designs) was the first thing I did when I started to design crocheted clothes.

I am sure that all of you have some favorite clothes there, which you will love to see in crochet or knit.

The advantage is that you have the garment to measure and to make notes about shapes and proportions.

One disadvantage is that sometimes it might be difficult to find the perfect yarn and stitch pattern to recreate the characteristics of the original fabric.

Another advantage is that if is something that you don’t like, you can easily undo and try one more time. Can be frustrating, but you have to think positive and see this as a learning process. You will learn a lot from failing, so don’t be afraid to try anything you have in mind.

Here are 2 of my favorite designs using my own clothes and I think the result is more than a pleasant one.

Mossy Jacket

 

Summer Crocheted Top

 

So, go check your wardrobe and see which of your beloved clothes will be your next crochet or knitting design.

  • Sewing Patterns

Another source that you can use with success if you just decided to design crochet or knit garments is sewing patterns.

Thanks to this amazing never ending source of inspiration for everything, called Internet you can find almost anything you want, just need to know what you are looking for.

I found sewing patterns very useful in the designing process, because you have measurements, you can see all the garment pieces and how everything will have to look before assembling the garment.

Having all the measurement the only thing you have to do is to find the proper yarn and stitch pattern. A few swatches will help you out to know how many stitches, rows you will need to get to the measurements.

Here, in the second photo, you don’t have the measurements, but you can see what you can do from 3 simple shapes.

So, using sewing pattern as an inspiration for your crochet or knit designs will help you a lot and is a good source if you just decided to step into the garments designing area.

One disadvantage is the same as with using your own clothes, not each sewing pattern can be used because it will be difficult to find a yarn and a stitch pattern that will give the same drape to the final piece. But, thanks God there are a lot of yarn types and stitch pattern to experiment with and I am sure that you will find something to get you closer to your inspiration.

And if not, you never know which masterpiece you will create even if is not even close with the original source. Just try it!

Here is one of my designs using a sewing pattern.

Be Glam Blouse

 

 

  • Street fashion

Street fashion is an important source of inspiration even for fashion designers and luckily you don’t have to be on streets to observe what people like to wear. You can use again Internet as a source of inspiration for street fashion.

Lately you can find a lot of knitwear on the streets and if you are not a knitter you have to know that many knit garments can be also made in crochet. Again, you will have to find a proper yarn and stitch pattern to recreate the characteristics of the original knitted fabric, but is not impossible.

To use street fashion as a source of your crochet or knit designs, you need a bit of experience and to have a few designs in your portfolio, because you need to be able to use just a photo as a source of inspiration.

You can also use shops as a source of inspiration either physical or online ones.

 I am usually using online shops as a design inspiration or as color inspiration for my designs. It’s easier to see which colors are in trend and to use them for your designs.

This helps also in color combination. If you are not that good to find a perfect color combo for your design, you can always look which colors are mostly used and find the perfect match that works with your idea.

Rainy Cloud Jumper

  • Vintage crocheted or knitted clothes

You already know that knitting and crochet are there for centuries and is an oldest way to make your own clothes.

You can find a lot of old photos with crochet clothes in which you can find inspiration.

If you are thinking that they might be too old to be in fashion you are wrong. Fashion trends are coming back and even the most known fashion designers are using old trends to recreate a contemporary one.

 

I love so much this jacket and I can’t wait to have some time to make a crocheted one.

  • Fashion Designers

Luckily for us, knitting and crochet is in trend now. There are a lot of Fashion designers that are using crochet or knit garments in their collections.

This can be a valuable source of inspiration for your designs because “a real fashion designer” was the source of your inspiration.

You can follow on Pinterest some fashion magazines and you will see a lot of inspirational photos there.

The only thing is that you don’t have to design something using a fashion designer inspiration in the same period, because your design can be easily labeled as a copy and you don’t want this to happen.  I will suggest to use a certain fashion designer’s idea for the next season or even years after. If you want to use this source now, try to find photos from older fashion shows.

  • Your own designs

And last, but not least, use your own designs as inspiration. After you have made quite a few you will see that you can find a good inspiration in your own older designs. The experience will help you to add different techniques and elements to an older design that will make a better new one.

  • Other crochet or knit designers

You know that you are not alone and there are many other crochet and knit designers are doing the same thing as you are.

I decided to talk a bit of other crochet and knit designers as a source of inspiration even if I am trying to not use it at all. Why? Because is very easy to copy even if you don’t want to, or without even think that you are doing it.

This can happen especially with simple designs. A top down sweater in double crochet is a top down sweater in double crochet and it will look almost the same, even if you are using different yarn weight or color. Even if your stitch count is different, so you didn’t copy the pattern and did your own math, in the end, the sweater is looking almost the same.

I will use other crochet and knit designers work as a source of learning technical things, like how to write a pattern, how to better join pieces of a garment or what techniques they are using for that professional look of the final design.

There are a lot of other sources of inspiration out there that you can use to create original designs and I will try avoid as much as possible other crochet and knit designer.

Let everyone have their place and their own original touch.

In the end, if you saw something and you really want to design your own garment, I will proceed the same as with the fashion designers inspiration: use that design for your future designs, even years after, meanwhile you might find some other idea.

I really hope this will help you find your own inspiration and if you find this material useful, I put everything in a PDF format that can be purchased from My Shop. click here